Singling Out Students Who “Got to Go”—An American Institution

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Let me just address the one

Let me just address the one opening sentence since that issue is the hook you use and never come back to in the article: "I watched in horror as a school resource officer flung a teenager halfway across a room in the name of school discipline." I don't recall seeing a teenager flung across a room-- yanked out her seat because she wouldn't abide by several adult's orders, yes, but not flung, not abused, not assaulted, as your sentence and many others have insinuated. How do we expect any school discipline when students like this don't listen to the teacher, principal, and then the police? What in the world is that parent like? How fair is this to all of the other students trying to do their work, but distracted by this one student? Why aren' we writing about that?

Bill more than 1 year ago

As a Success Academy parent

As a Success Academy parent and a Progressive, I can tell you that many Progressives are wrong about Success Academy, both on the facts and on the context. In many economically impoverished neighborhoods of NYC, that have schools where over 80% of students read or add below grade level, Success Academy offers a substantially better alternative to most kids. Parents know that and flock to it, with 10 applications for every open seats. Success Academy is not perfect, but once you look at the other alternatives in these neighborhoods - oh boy, then you begin to understand why Success Academy is so popular.

Yuri N more than 1 year ago

Yuri, thanks for sharing your

Yuri, thanks for sharing your view as a parent. I know for me as a teacher, your last line made me both empathetic and sad. I think this article (and many Success Academy critics) understand that these charter schools may be much than the alternative-- and that's the problem. Families shouldn't have to hope for a 10-to-1 chance to attend a school that is also, in its own way, riddled with problems. Simply because a charter is slightly better (or even better but with racist practices) doesn't mean it isn't critically failing a community. From a systematic view, I have a hard time accepting "school choice" when it means that 9 other kids go to a neighborhood school that is, as you note, potentially far worse from the alternative.

I can't help but wonder what would happen if the time, money, and power given to many of these schools were given to fixing the system at large and supporting neighborhood schools and entire communities. That said, I don't fault you or any other parent for wanting to get your students into these schools. I am frustrated that folks like the ones running big charters take advantage of communities that are already struggling.

CT more than 1 year ago

Yuri, thanks for sharing your

Yuri, thanks for sharing your view as a parent. I know for me as a teacher, your last line made me both empathetic and sad. I think this article (and many Success Academy critics) understand that these charter schools may be much than the alternative-- and that's the problem. Families shouldn't have to hope for a 10-to-1 chance to attend a school that is also, in its own way, riddled with problems. Simply because a charter is slightly better (or even better but with racist practices) doesn't mean it isn't critically failing a community. From a systematic view, I have a hard time accepting "school choice" when it means that 9 other kids go to a neighborhood school that is, as you note, potentially far worse from the alternative.

I can't help but wonder what would happen if the time, money, and power given to many of these schools were given to fixing the system at large and supporting neighborhood schools and entire communities. That said, I don't fault you or any other parent for wanting to get your students into these schools. I am frustrated that folks like the ones running big charters take advantage of communities that are already struggling.

CT more than 1 year ago

As a parent of a Success

I wanted to comment, but your web site strips line breaks, making it impossible to post a medium to large size comment, containing several paragraphs, because it becomes unreadable.

Yuri N more than 1 year ago

What happened to

What happened to Responsibility and Accountability?
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.Why isn’t somebody somewhere Responsible for actually fixing problems in Public Schools?
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Isn’t somebody somewhere Accountable to public school children and their families ? Accountable for results in their own public schools, Not just to find ways to get the children and their families’ public schools out-of-sight, “off the books” as charters!
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The rush to charters, without actually solving pedagogy issues in public schools first, is just ‘kicking the can further down the road’. Let’s actually deal with issues in public schools, before passing the buck to charters.
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Just one of those (central) issues to be solved is at LucidWitness . com . . . (Search "The Rush to Charters Ignores Real Issue") http://lucidwitness.com/2014/06/18/we-all-ignore-a-real-issue/

Daun Kauffman more than 1 year ago

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