Atlanta Trial: The Ultimate in Test-and-Punish

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Yeah, when it comes to

Yeah, when it comes to cheating and White kids and educators - not so much (justice).

The news media (and the courts?), also, need to look into the 2004 Siemens Science 'competition' scandal and its 10 year, deliberate, cover-up. Over 60-80 million people were never told the truth about that one, including any of the 1200+ other contestants! Could be an even bigger scandal than the Atlanta teacher cheating scandal, because even more people were involved in the cover-up of the 2004 scandal - including some journalists! Could also be a lot bigger than the Brian Williams and Rolling Stone scandal, as well.

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/PersonOfWeek/story?id=319677&page=1
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/6666008/ns/us_news-environment/t/energy-invention-nets-scholarship-teen/
http://articles.latimes.com/print/2005/jan/05/local/me-class5
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/science/2004-12-06-siemens-prize_x.htm

I found the actual 'facts', here:

http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:GyroWaveGen(tm)

The-Truth-Seeker more than 2 years ago

Why so many articles in

Why so many articles in support of the teachers' unions? It is often claimed that the children's interests come first but your constant drumbeat suggests otherwise. Is it more progressive to defend teachers' power and well-being, or to confront a system that doesn't work for our kids? Organized labor is powerful within progressivism, but are union preferences to be maintained even after so many of our children are shortchanged? One might think that charter schools, school choice, and other innovations might be supported and deemed "progressive" but one would be wrong. The Progressive answer is always to spend more on teachers and to resent oversight from those seeking accountability.

Chihare more than 2 years ago

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